Sunday, April 21, 2013

Singer Stylist 543

Does this poor neglected sewing machine look lonely? I thought it did.


I picked this machine up on Sunday afternoon, which means the poor thing had been sitting on the shelf for almost 4 entire days during the 50% off green-tag sale at Goodwill. I just couldn't resist. And it came with the manual. I couldn't ask for more. Well, ok, it would have been nice to have a box of accessories hidden away somewhere.

The 543 is almost identical to the 533 down in the basement (I mean, in my repair facility), with the exception being buttonhole settings on the main stitch length dial of the 543.

I put the threading diagram up so others can see how to thread these machines.


This next photo shows the interior of the case top, where the extension table resides when not in use. I think a lot of people don't realize the table is conveniently stored there.


The 543 has a full rotary hook, low shank so it can take most any attachments, and Class 66 bobbin. This may be my new everyday machine (everymonth?), displacing the Kenmore model 385 pictured below.

9 comments:

  1. I have a Singer Stylist 522 and a 533. I like them both. The gears aren't metal but I think they'd be easy to replace on these models. I think a belt replacement would be difficult.

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  2. I agree on the belt. If one of mine did need replacement, I don't know that I'd want to take that on. The machine may just turn into a parts donor.

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    1. I just had a Model 533 dropped on my bench (because my girlfriend says I don't have enough things to fix) that is constantly breaking needles. Is there an adjustment for this?

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  3. I was searching for a vintage free arm machine when my friend David gave me a Stylist 522 that was going to be thrown away at the antique mall he's a member of. It's a surprisingly strong machine. I've repaired jeans with it using a size 16 needle. I knew I risked breaking a gear but the machine was free so I didn't care. I use an all metal machine to hem jeans now.

    The 700 series Touch & Sew machines from the early 70s have the same belt set up. I was told when replacing the belt, the top horizontal shaft needs to be removed from the front end of the machine. I would really have to love a sewing machine to go through all that work. I'd be afraid of not putting it all back together correctly.

    It's a shame they didn't design the top horizontal bar (that the belt is on) to come apart in 2 pieces near the handwheel. Making removal of the belt easier. My local repair guy mentioned that Brother did this for their machines, not sure what model. But the mindset was planned obsolescence. And I've read that the "Stylist" were Singer's lower end machines so the additional engineering would have been out of the question.

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  4. I want to hear what you think of your Singer Stylist.

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  5. A friend of mine was in our local sewing machine repair shop. A woman decided she didn't want to pay the repair cost for new gears in her Singer Stylist 514 (flat bed). So she told our repair guy to pitch the machine. My friend took it with the intention of dropping it off at a recycling center that takes scrap metal. He offered it to me. The motor sounds good, the belt looks good and the paint is in excellent condition. Don't know when I'll replace the gears.

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  6. I do very little sewing but I've determined that if/when I do another project, the 543 (or 533) will be the one I use. That 514 machine you got should have a lot of good parts on it. Free machines are always a good score.

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  7. Are you interested in selling this Singer Stylist 543, or do you have an extra extension table for it you would like to sell? Thanks!

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    1. I have a Singer Stylist 543 that I would like to sell, it is in very good condition and it has the extension table, but no hood cover. Asking $100 for it, plus shipping. Let me know if you are interested.

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