Monday, August 19, 2013

New Home 6000 - Cleaning, oiling, adjusting

Part two of the continuing saga of the Binford 6000, a.k.a. New Home Memory Craft 6000. This first photo is of the handwheel side of the machine with the cover removed. A cogged belt goes from the motor to the handwheel and a second cogged belt goes from the handwheel to the bottom shaft.


Of course, to remove the handwheel side cover, one must know where all the hidden screws are. This next photo shows the side cover, and directly in the center of the photo is a little piece of plastic on the right side of the top slot. The New Home Engineering Department decided that small area was a perfect place to hide a screw, which holds the back (rearward) part of the cover to the machine. Oh, and it's an allen head screw, not a Phillips head like every other screw on the machine.


Here are a few more photos of the innards. The first photo below shows the main shaft thrust bearing that is in need of a slight adjustment. Looks to be about 1/16" gap...


A mighty 0.86 amp motor.


The machine is made of cast aluminum, with just a few parts made of plastic, like the button housing on the left of the photo (with the red cardboard covering the electronics).


The perforated wheel on the main shaft is for speed sensing, I'm guessing. A stepper motor under the main shaft controls left/right swing of the needle. There are no cams in this machine, the patterns are all created by circuit boards, integrated circuits (chips) and stepper motors.


Another stepper motor in the base of the machine controls forward/reverse movement of the feed dogs. On occasion this stepper has stopped working, which then causes the whole machine to stop. I fiddled with the stepper motor and got the machine to work as it should but don't know if the stepper will continue to cause problems. When the machine is working, it is working well. Maybe this is why someone gave the machine to Goodwill...

10 comments:

  1. Hello there. Would you be willing to sell this beast- assuming that your cover experiment was not catastrophic :-) Iearned to sew on one of these machines many years ago. My daughter is learning to sew now and I think it would be great to get on a machine like this. Thanks, Amber

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would. I'll try to contact you through blogger email.

      Delete
    2. Amber, can you email me at redxl883c@gmail.com.

      Delete
    3. I had emailed you about 30 minutes ago, with some questions on my new home via redx1883c@gmail.com and it was not a working
      is it still good?
      Thank you.

      Delete
    4. My email address has an L before the first 8, and it looks like you may have used a 1.

      Delete
  2. Hi. I left a comment on your earlier post of this machine but have a question. Why do you refer to it as a "Binford"? I've never heard that label before and I believe the company changed its name to Janome. This is their first computerized machine which I understand can also work as a non-computerized machine. By the way, in all the years (30+) that I've been sewing on it, I've NEVER taken it in for service, not even a cleaning. Maybe I should pop that bottom and see what's lurking there! But I've always kept it clean. I also never noticed the LED lights at the bottom but now, even with the machine unplugged, the top one is lit. When I first turned it over it was plugged in and nothing was lit but when I turned it on its side, two lights came on, the top and third (I think). Then I turned it off and the top remained lit. Unplugged it and top is still lit. Strange. I usually leave it plugged in, perhaps now I won't.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was trying, perhaps unsuccessfully, to be funny and mimic Tim Allen on the old "Home Improvement" TV show. Whenever he introduced a new tool on the program, they were always made by Binford and they would always have a number after them, like a Binford 6100 rotary hammer or whatever. This New Home 6000 reminded me of Tim Allen's show.

      That's wonderful that your sewing machine is still going strong. Regarding the light remaining on, it will probably go out after a while after being unplugged. My guess is there is a large capacitor in the circuitry that is powering the light for a while after the machine is unplugged.

      Delete
  3. Thank you so much for posting this! I am working on fixing one of these machines after it was flooded in the Texas floods this year. I could not figure out how to open the thing up and you are the ONLY place online who mentions the invisible screw :) Thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very cool. Always nice to hear this little blog is of some help. Thanks for the post!

      Delete
  4. well hello there. I found one of these at a goodwill for $25 and i've been using her without opening and cleaning her out hehe but thanks to you now i know how. ;-)

    ReplyDelete